Tuesday, 18 April 2017

Tunisian doctors officially oppose gay "anal tests"

English translation of poster text: Is it possible to refuse an anal test? From a legal point of view: It is possible to refuse an anal test when examined by a forensic doctor. But the reality is different. The victims often “accept” the test for fear of being tortured, because of their young age, or because they are unaware of their rights guaranteed by the Constitution. 
Sounds like a no brainer, but so called "anal tests" to prove or disprove someone is gay are still used in many countries believe it or not. Supposedly proving someone has been involved in sodomy by sodomising them with objects seems to me an exercise in futility.

But alas, anal exams are documented by Human Rights Watch as being used in Cameroon, Egypt, Kenya, Lebanon, Turkmenistan, Uganda, and Zambia, and Tanzania, as well as Tunisia. However the Tunisian doctors have now taken a stand against such a practice, which is classified in any other jurisdiction as torture and vastly at odds with a doctors charter not to harm people.

Forced anal exams violate the Convention against Torture, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, and the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights. As the United Nations Committee Against Torture has emphasized, they “have no medical justification and cannot be performed with the free and informed consent of the persons subjected to them, who consequently will then be prosecuted.” For medical practitioners to conduct such exams is a violation of medical ethics, Human Rights Watch said.

 The statement from Tunisia’s medical council said that doctors must henceforth inform peoples that they have the right to refuse the exam. Prohibiting doctors from carrying out anal exams without consent is a step in the right direction, but because of their unscientific nature, the use of anal exams to test for consensual homosexual conduct should cease altogether, regardless of consent, Human Rights Watch said. In that sense, the medical council’s statement does not go far enough: it leaves open the possibility that someone accused of same-sex conduct might “consent” to an anal exam under pressure from police, because they believe their refusal will be held against them, or because they believe it will prove their innocence.

 Doctors in the Tunisian towns of Sousse and Kairouan subjected at least seven men accused of sodomy under article 230 of the penal code to forced anal exams in 2015, sparking a civil society movement against the practice. Human Rights Watch interviewed the men, some of whom described the forced anal exams as akin to rape. A 22-year-old student subjected to an anal exam in Kairouan told Human Rights Watch: “I felt like I was an animal, because I felt like I didn’t have any respect. I felt like they were violating me. I feel that up to now.” Human Rights Watch

Petition here Tell Tunisia to end gay torture now.